When is it time to change careers?

New year, new you. Out with the old; in with the new. Make a brand new start. Or how about one of my favorites, “You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream” (C.S. Lewis). When New Year’s rolls around, we often find ourselves contemplating change. What type of change are you considering this year? Buying/selling a home. Relocating. Losing weight. Exercising more often. Traveling. Finding the man of our dreams (and marrying him). Getting pregnant. Adopting a puppy. What about a career change or new job?

model-2614569_1280It’s natural to set goals, make resolutions, and fine-tune our life’s focus in January. Part of that fine tuning for many of us involves initiating a job search. For some, it involves changing careers and embarking an exciting career adventure.

How do you know if you’re really ready to search for a job or change career paths?

Assessing your level of career contentment

When I work with clients who are contemplating a career change, we start by assessing their current level of contentment at work. Are you happy to arrive at work most mornings? Do you hit snooze and feel anxious or depressed about the workplace? How long have you felt dissatisfied with your job? When you attend work events, do you network with others or stay for 10 minutes before escaping? Do you live for the weekend? Are you excited about your current projects and tasks? Do you share your excitement with your friends/family? Or do you complain about the problems at work instead?

Checking our level of contentment is important. We have to evaluate a) how we truly feel about our jobs/careers, and b) why we might feel that way. Sometimes clients find that the problem lies within themselves. Maybe they’re struggling with stress at home, and it’s bleeding over into the workplace. Some of my clients chose a career path for all the wrong reasons to begin with and feel stuck. I’ve even referred clients to counselors if we discover there’s nothing wrong at work, and they just need some overall wellness help.

When you discover your career contentment level is low

I once found myself working in a corporate job, earning more money than I’d ever earned before in my life. The workplace was pretty upbeat, and the dress code was very casual. The expectations were reasonable. My colleagues were friendly and fun. So what was the problem? I just didn’t enjoy my tasks. I chose the job based on earning potential, not fulfillment potential. And I wanted to live closer to my husband (who was my boyfriend at that time).

Once I’d identified that I was dissatisfied at work, I examined whether I could change aspects of the job or my attitude. I worked diligently to find things to be grateful for at work, and that helped the days go by faster. But there wasn’t much I could do to alter other aspects of the job. I couldn’t force myself to love the nature of the job. And I couldn’t relocate the company or work remotely. My husband couldn’t relocate because he owned a business in a different region.

Taking action and making career decisions

What should I do next? Once I’d established that I either had to accept the job and continue doing it or search for a new one, I went through my normal decision-making process.

During my time of reflection, talking to my mentor, and praying about the decision, I saw the solution clearly. I decided to send a message to several friends living near my husband. I asked for their help in finding employment. And I waited and prayed.

Less than 24 hours later, one of my friends, someone I’d known for years, responded and offered me a job. He warned me that the position didn’t pay very well. But he also gave me the option to accept the job temporarily while searching for more gainful employment. I saw this as a clear sign to move forward and make the change. I accepted the position after a phone interview and gave a two-week notice at work. By Christmas, I was on my way to relocating and interviewing for other jobs while working in a temporary job.

The next step

I’m not trying to tell you that if you click your heels and make a wish—or say a prayer—your dream job will fall in your lap. But I am trying to share a career discovery and decision-making process that has worked pretty well for me. Take the right steps and remain action-oriented. But don’t forget to follow your gut at the end of the day. If a big paycheck isn’t satisfying you, that’s okay. Can you make lifestyle adjustments to lower your standard of living? If you used to love serving others as a teacher, but you feel exhausted in every way, it’s okay. What other careers interest you? Do you have transferable skills?

We can talk one-on-one about your current feelings about work. And we can develop a plan of action for the coming year. Reach out to me for help if you’re ready to get to work and find career fulfillment.

How to take productive breaks

In my twenties and into my early thirties, I repeatedly heard this from supervisors, more experienced colleagues, and authors: “Show up early, stay late, and dress for the job you want, not the job you have.” I took that advice to heart. Almost daily, I arrived early and stayed late, even though no one around me did so. You don’t want to know how much I spent on my work wardrobe. I was the poster child for going above and beyond. I utilized LinkedIn and Facebook like crazy immediately after they hit the internet. My goal was to prove myself a productive, passionate employee. I knew employers were looking for productive employees. This soft skill is consistently ranked near the top of employers’ preferred soft skills lists.

stress-2860034_1280I killed it at work and consistently set and exceeded goals, created successful new programs, and found solutions to organizational problems. But my work-life balance was a joke. A true workaholic, I found myself wallowing in work rather than living a life of my own. My relationships suffered, and my health did, too. I found that the more I worked, the less productive I became. The more I worked, the less I cared about the purpose/mission which used to drive me to succeed. The more I worked, the more discontent I felt.

Over time, I learned to strike a better balance. I left work at work and discovered my own interests aside from my career. More importantly, I maintained a high level of career success while living my own life. I could simultaneously be productive and feel well. One of many ways I struck this balance was by learning to take more breaks at work. Sounds ironic, doesn’t it? How does taking breaks help you become more productive?

Get up and move.

Sitting in a chair kills your back. This isn’t new news. Many companies now offer employees standing or convertible desks or at least more ergonomically correct desks. But most of us still find ourselves seated while working if we work traditional desk jobs. You have to give your body a break if you expect it to perform all day long. Stand up and stretch. Break out some  yoga poses. Fit in three sets of squats or crunches in a few minutes’ time. Walk around the office, to the restroom, or to the fridge to get a bottle of water. Whatever you do, don’t sit still for longer than an hour without changing your body position for at least a few minutes.

When we get up and move, we come back to our desks ready to work again and feel more productive and focused and less tense.

Go outside.

There’s no shortage of research indicating benefits related to experiencing nature and breathing fresh air. Want to be more productive, less stressed, and healthier? Spend a little time outdoors each day at work. You don’t have to work from home in the woods to reap these benefits. Go out on the balcony and absorb some sunlight for a few moments while making a phone call. Meditate on the flower bed for a few moments. Walk outside with a coworker for 10 minutes twice a day. Then go back to work renewed, invigorated, and more productive.

Laugh.

When I’m working on something dead serious or conflict-ridden, I need a mental and emotional break. Why not spend a few moments recording a silly video of yourself for your child? You’ll build your relationship while letting yourself unwind. Read a Laffy Taffy joke. Look at a few photos you keep on your phone of fun moments with your friends and family. Play a quick game of hacky sack with a colleague. You’ll both get a little exercise while looking ridiculous and build your friendship, too. It’s healthy to be happy, and happy workers are productive.

Take a nap.

Yes. I said it. A NAP. When I worked as a full-time faculty member, I purchased a reclining rocker for my office. It served two purposes: it eased my back while grading, and it provided a perfect resting spot mid-day. I’ve never been one to fall asleep when I rest or nap. But if I close my eyes, get still and quiet, and pray or meditate for even five minutes, I feel less groggy and more productive.

Don’t have a reclining rocker? Rest your head atop your arms on your desk for a few moments. Walk to your car and recline your seat. Always set a timer in case you’re tired enough to fall asleep. Resting during your lunch break may be a good option if your employer frowns upon mini breaks at your desk.

Coffee.

20170729_165639A few cups of coffee a day won’t hurt you (unless your doctor says otherwise). If coffee’s not your thing, find another hot drink you love. The point is to relax, sit still, and enjoy something simple without trying to multi-task and answer emails, too. It’s hard to remain tense after spending a few minutes sipping a hot cup of coffee or tea in a quiet space. Or take a coffee break with your mentor, colleague, or business associate.

Get inspired.

Read one page of inspirational literature. Keep a daily reader or devotional book at your desk or bookmark blogs you find motivational and inspirational. This feeds your spirit and gives your mind a fresh focus on positive content.

Reach out.

Take a break to network with your colleagues, friends, mentors, or family members. You’ll feel less isolated and do good to others at the same time. Send a message to someone struggling to ask how she’s doing. Chat with a colleague about a big project. Send thank you cards to a few people who’ve helped you recently.

Get grateful.

Create a short gratitude list every day during one of your breaks. Keep it in a journal or Google doc so you can reflect on better moments when times are tough. Thinking about blessings distracts us from problems at work. A positive distraction can help us revisit the problem with renewed determination to find a solution.

Need help striking a better work-life balance? Want to teach your employees or students to be more productive? I can help.

 

Why reflecting on past work experience helps us make better career choices

We only learn from the past if we reflect on the past. This is true in every area of life, and our career journeys are no exception. Recently I reflected on which three job roles/work experiences best prepared me for my role as a career coach/entrepreneur. I also contemplated which job experiences I enjoyed most and why.

People Looking Choosing at Colleagues PhotoI only had time to discuss my three favorite/best jobs. There have been many more. I believe none of our work experience is wasted. Even jobs I held for a short time taught me crucial soft skills, including conflict management and problem-solving strategies. When I had to quit an interim director’s position for a non-profit due to a hostile work environment, I learned big lessons. I learned how to stand up for myself at work, to carry myself with grace and dignity, and how to discern red flags during the interview process.

Did you know that even the most boring work experience prepared me for future roles? Although I didn’t love technical writing, that experience helped me revise and edit well, and I’ve used that skill as an English faculty member and as a content manager. I also rely on my own writing skills when producing content for my career coaching business.

And that one-year gig in software sales? Absolutely helps me during free consultations, when producing content, and when reaching out to my network to drum up referrals.

It’s so important that we reflect on our previous jobs before leaping forward with our job search or making a big career change. Why? If we don’t, we’re doomed to repeat our own mistakes. We may not identify red flags as truly red during the hiring process. And we will work in professions which leave us feeling unfulfilled, depressed, and disgruntled.

Even though I don’t know you, I know you don’t want that for yourself. And I don’t want it for you.

Take time to reach out to me to schedule a free consultation. Simply spending 15-20 minutes on the phone with a career coach can help you uncover and discover many of your career desires and goals. I’ll walk you through a simple assessment of your career journey. We can talk about your own best and worst jobs. I will direct you to more career development assessment tools if necessary. And I’ll provide you with quality career development and job search tools as we work together.

What are you waiting for? Let’s get to work.

Before writing your resume, do this:

I often work with clients who want to jump right into writing a resume. I understand that desire because a resume is one of the most important tools in your job search and career development toolbox. Many clients are also skittish about spending too much time or money working with a career coach, and they assume working on their resume may be their first and final step to career success. Before you start writing your resume, make sure you’re truly ready. Don’t bypass key steps which will ensure a stronger resume.


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Before you even consider revising or creating a resume, you have to do one thing: define your career goals.

Get clear about why you’re unhappy with your current job or feeling motivated to change careers, seek a promotion, or switch jobs. If you don’t know the why, the “how” won’t help you in the end. Creating a solid resume is a pertinent part of your job search. But if you try to create a resume with no clear career direction in sight, your resume will, at best, be a generic list of your experience, qualifications, and accomplishments. It won’t include a concise professional summary because you must consider your career goals when writing a professional summary. It won’t feature keywords matching jobs you’re applying for, because you won’t know which jobs you hope to land. Because it lacks keywords and phrases matching the positions you’re applying for, you may not receive any offers for interviews because your resume will never make it past the ATS (applicant tracking system). And you’ll have to include all your experience rather than hand-picking which experiences best match the position you’re applying for.

Obviously this is a poor approach for resume writing. Instead, work with a career coach (or if you’re a college student, a career services professional on-campus) to define your career goals.

  1. In order to define your career goals, you might need to take some career assessments. Assessment tools can help clarify your interests, skills, personality type, and workplace preferences. Review your results with a career coach. Spending a few hours on career assessment can save you years of wasted time in a job you hate.
  2. Take a look at your branding efforts. Your brand is basically your reputation, both personally and professionally. How do others see you? Why not ask them? Ask three colleagues, former supervisors, fellow grads, or friends to tell you what they identify as your greatest strengths and weaknesses. Ask them what careers or jobs they imagine you would love and succeed in. This feedback—paired with your assessment results and personal reflections—can help you write an effective branding statement, bio, and elevator pitch. If you’re not a great writer, that’s okay. I have professional writing experience, and we can work on developing these pieces together.
  3. Reach out to me for a free consultation. Explain your job search snafus and career obstacles, and answer questions as honestly as possible. This brief conversation helps many of my clients to gain clarity and direction. It can also help identify which areas you need to improve most.

If you feel unclear about where you’re going—but know you don’t like where you are—taking these three steps can help point you in the right direction for you. Reach out to me to schedule a free consultation.

Scary interview moments

Let’s face it—interviews can be downright scary. Many of us, no matter how much work experience or charisma we possess, feel intimidated when we’re being analyzed and assessed by recruiters and hiring managers during interviews. Even basic communication with human resources professionals can feel daunting. We don’t want to use too many exclamation points, but if we don’t use ANY, will they understand our enthusiasm regarding the job opening? There’s a lot to consider and many steps to take prior to and during a job interview.

Hopefully these two videos and tips will help you walk through the interview process unscathed and come out on the other side with a job offer in hand.


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Scary interview moments (and how to overcome your fears):

Calling and emailing to inquire about interview details.

After you’ve landed the job interview, you might need to contact the employer to verify details. Of course, my first suggestion is to prevent this situation. You can do this by asking a few key questions when the interviewer contacts you. Take notes when the recruiter calls you to schedule the interview or save the email you receive containing pertinent information. During that initial call, or immediately after receiving the initial email, verify time, date, and location. If you’re unfamiliar with the job site or interview location, ask clarifying questions or request a physical address. Don’t forget to ask where to go within the building and where to sign in when you arrive, either.

If you forget to ask these questions, or if you think of other questions you might need to ask, don’t hesitate to call or email the employer prior to the interview. But use caution—no recruiter wants to respond to 10 emails from a candidate before she’s ever interviewed the candidate.

Backing out of an interview if you decide you’re not interested.

If you decide the job opening isn’t a good fit for you, or if you land another job after scheduling the interview, you need to respect the potential employer enough to politely decline the interview opportunity. I suggest doing this via a short email so there’s a lasting record of your communication; voicemails are too easily deleted and forgotten.

Even if you don’t believe you’ll ever be interested in working for the company in the future, be prompt and polite when declining interview opportunities. You might change your mind and apply for a different job opening in a few months. Or the recruiter you’re communicating with might leave that company, and you may find yourself facing her when you apply with Company B in a few months. Ending on good terms is key to successful professional networking.

Running late to a job interview.

Again, prevention works better in this case than damage control. Try to avoid arriving late by taking extra precautions against tardiness. Allow yourself about twice as much time as usual to shower, dress, eat, and drive to the interview location. Set at least two alarms so you won’t oversleep. Allow yourself at least 5-10 minutes of quiet reflection time before leaving for the interview. And plan to pull into the company parking lot about 10-15 minutes prior to your actual interview time.

If all these tips don’t work, and you run into unforeseen problems on the way (such as a horrible traffic jam), call or email the employer immediately. Don’t wait until five minutes before the interview starts to call to notify the employer you’re running late. Call as soon as you realize you simply don’t have enough time to arrive promptly. And by all means, don’t make up ridiculous stories about having to stop your car at the end of the driveway to help an elderly woman carry groceries into her house, which held you up for an hour… or anything equally as unbelievable. Employers aren’t stupid, and they’d rather you simply let them know you’re running five minutes late than listen to your false fish stories.

Understand that if you’re late to a job interview, your chances for landing the job drop significantly. You’re communicating to the employer that the interview appointment simply wasn’t important enough to you to ensure prompt arrival. Arriving late demonstrates lack of time management skills—and all employers want to hire candidates who demonstrate mastery of this soft skill. Whether you feel this way or not is irrelevant, so do your best to arrive a little early and avoid this scary predicament.


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Deciding what to wear to a job interview.

Selecting interview attire can feel overwhelming. You want to make a great first impression. Do it by selecting interview attire which is appropriate, comfortable, and professional. And yes, you can find a suit which meets all three criteria! If you’re uncomfortable and wear clothing which is too tight, too long, too short, or another TOO, you’ll be unable to focus on responding to interview questions. And if you under dress, you’ll quickly recognize your mistake and will feel embarrassed throughout the interview. You might think it’s okay to wear jeans because the dress policy at that company calls for casual attire. Don’t. If the employees wear jeans, you still need to wear interview-appropriate attire. Go for business casual if you’re interviewing with a casual organization. Wear a suit otherwise.

If you can’t afford a suit, pair up separates which create the impression of a suit. If you’re a male, by all means, wear a tie and shine your shoes. And if you’re a female, avoid super high heels, excessive perfume or makeup, and over-the-top accessories. It’s also important to remember that your appearance includes your facial expression and non-verbal communication. When you greet the employer, smile. Ensure your posture is open (don’t cross your arms or fidget with your purse). Leave your phone in the car or at least put it on silent mode.

Realizing you are poorly prepared for the interview.

When you don’t research the company/position, you’ll have a sinking feeling in your stomach when asked, “What do you know about our company?” or “Why are you interested in working here?” And you WILL be asked these questions—most employers ask common interview questions, even if they word them a little differently.

You can prevent this by spending plenty of time researching the company and the job role online. If you know current employees, reach out to them and ask their opinions of the work environment, company culture, supervisors, etc. Wouldn’t you rather learn that your potential boss carries a terrible, micromanaging reputation BEFORE the interview than AFTER you’ve accepted the position?

You’ll also need to practice responding to interview questions, especially those tricky questions about why you’re leaving your employer or why you were out of work for two years. Think carefully about your interview outfit, and map directions to the interview site (whether you prefer printed directions or simply enter the location into your smartphone).

Answering difficult interview questions.

We all get tired of responding to the same old commonly asked interview questions. But guess what? You’ll probably be asked those same questions, so you better prepare to respond well. The best way to prepare to respond to interview questions is to schedule a mock interview with a career coach. If you can’t afford to pay for professional interview coaching, at least print out common interview questions and ask a friend or family member to grill you a few times. Or if you’re more comfortable preparing on your own, sit in front of a mirror while responding to questions or record yourself responding to questions using your webcam.

Interview coaching not only helps you prepare the right words to say, but it also helps you avoid the wrong phrasing. A career coach can also provide objective feedback regarding your body language, level of anxiety, and more.

Overcoming general anxiety and introversion during the interview.

Let me assure you that you’re not the only one who feels anxious about interviews. I rarely work with a client who expresses total confidence before a job interview. Even if you aren’t introverted, you may feel anxious because you haven’t interviewed for jobs in years or because you genuinely want to land the job and don’t want to screw up during the interview.

There are many ways you can ease your anxiety and even overcome introversion. Prepare and practice. Research the company. Dress appropriately, comfortably, and professionally.  Follow every bit of advice in this article and on the videos, and you’ll find that you’re much less nervous. You can also ease your nerves by avoiding cigarettes and excessive caffeine before the interview, getting plenty of sleep in advance, and eating a well-balanced meal or snack with water.

Getting rid of anxiety can help you perform well throughout the interview process and end the interview knowing you have a great chance of being selected to fill the position.

The interview process can genuinely be scary. But there are so many ways you can prevent your fears from standing in between you and your dream job. Reach out to me to schedule an interview coaching session and to up your odds of interview success.

What am I doing wrong in my job search?

If I had a dollar for every time I’ve been asked this question, I’d be working remotely while at the beach on vacation! Frustrated job seekers who’ve been searching for a new job for months or even years obviously want to identify the problems they’re facing. And when working with clients, I am repeatedly asked to help them identify those problems.

There are a few times when I’ve worked with job seekers facing clear discrimination in the job search. Perhaps a company is retaliating against them and refusing to give them a good reference for no factually based reason. Maybe the job seeker identifies as a minority, and recruiters express bias during the job search. But more often than not, when job seekers continue to search for a long period of time and do not land a great job, the problem lies with the candidate’s job search strategy.

I recently recorded two videos to help frustrated job seekers identify the problems in their job search. Hopefully these videos can help you, too, if you find yourself working very hard to land a job but feel like you’re spinning your wheels.


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  1. Take a look at your resume. Almost always, when a client tells me he’s been applying for countless jobs and receiving no interview offers, the client’s resume isn’t working for him for one reason or another. I can help you identify the reasons and fix the problems.
  2. Maybe your resume looks fantastic, but your branding efforts are nil or negative. Are you on social media? If you’re avoiding it like the plague, which can actually harm you more than it can help you. If you’re online but aren’t really taking full advantage of networking and branding opportunities on social media, you may be missing the boat there. Or maybe you’re branding yourself negatively and portraying yourself as the type of employee no one wants to hire. Branding or networking coaching can improve your strategy and up the odds you’ll start landing interview opportunities.
  3. Are you landing interview opportunities but aren’t receiving any job offers? Something is going wrong during the interview process. What is it? Maybe you’re not dressing appropriately. Perhaps you are communicating poorly prior to the interview, and by the time you arrive, the recruiter doesn’t even want to speak to you. Maybe you were running late, and you ruined the opportunity by making a poor first impression. Assess your non-verbal communication skills—what you say without speaking often says more than words. Or maybe you simply need to practice answering common interview questions to discern if your responses are appropriate and effective. Interview coaching is absolutely going to help you.


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  1. Are you getting job offers but keep turning them down? You might need to reassess your career goals. Or perhaps you’re simply applying for positions which don’t list salary ranges, and you’re being offered much less than you’re worth—and don’t know how to negotiate for more.
  2. Lastly, if you’re landing interviews but aren’t landing job opportunities, you should evaluate your soft skills. Employers are looking to hire someone who meets the minimum qualifications and possesses core competencies. But they’re also trying to hire a candidate who will fit in with the company culture and someone who will be a pleasure to work with. Soft skills coaching may be necessary to ensure that you stand out among other candidates (and receive the job offer).

If you find yourself stuck at any point in the job search and are not getting the results you want, reach out to me for help. I want to help you do what you love.

Before an informational interview

You might need to learn more about a career field to determine your degree path in college. Maybe you want an “in” with a particular company. Or perhaps you’re considering changing careers or seeking a promotion into a career zone that’s unfamiliar. Whatever your reasons, requesting an informational interview can feel pretty intimidating. Here are some tips to ease your nerves and help you prepare.


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  1. Ask the right person for the right reasons. Do you know how many people randomly ask professionals to meet with them for 30 minutes for an informational interview yet don’t give adequate thought to why they’re asking? Many—and this is why some mentors and seasoned professionals are a bit aloof when you ask for an informational interview.If you’re going to ask someone for 10 minutes of talk time, be sure you’re asking the right person first. Do you want advice about starting a consulting business? Ask an entrepreneur who’s started her own consulting business. Are you considering leaving teaching as a career? Ask someone for advice who’s already been there, done it, and is happy with the outcome (and ask someone who wishes he’d never left, too, because balance in perspective is crucial when making career decisions).
  2. After you’ve identified a great person to interview, nail down your purpose for the interview. Notice “purpose” is singular—don’t ask more than 3-5 questions unless you’re sending questions via email. And even then, respect your interviewee’s time by sticking to a clear, concise plan. Don’t forget to clearly communicate your purpose when requesting the interview. Most people don’t want to agree to spend 30 minutes with a pseudo-stranger unless there’s a stated purpose/plan or perceived benefit.
  3. As much as you need to be clear and concise, you also need to be flexible. If your interviewee offers you a tour of her company’s manufacturing facilities, by all means, say yes! Does that mean you’ll spend an hour and a half there instead of the 30 minutes you expected? Yes, and that’s fabulous! Leave your schedule open for at least a 2-hour block of time when you schedule an informational interview; however, try to watch the clock and wrap up your line of questioning in 30 minutes unless your interviewee is obviously enjoying herself and rambling. Let her go on and on if she likes. She’s the expert/mentor, so sit back, listen, and absorb her experience and knowledge.
  4. While we’re on the subject of time management, remember to arrive on time. There’s simply no way to make a worst first impression than to arrive terribly late. If you get lost or stuck in traffic, call ahead to let your interviewee know what’s happening. If you’ll be more than a few minutes late, ask if he would rather reschedule or continue with the interview. Be prepared for him to request to reschedule.
  5. Prepare your list of questions (3-5, ideally) and bring a hard copy with you. It’s very distracting to talk to someone while she’s clicking or scrolling on an electronic device. Put your phone down, leave the laptop at home, and break out a pen and paper for informational interviews. This allows you to make better eye contact and display your soft skills, including active listening and mindfulness.
  6. Be prepared to tell your interviewee a bit about yourself, too. Create an elevator pitch and practice in advance to avoid stumbling over your words when he asks you to tell him about your own career background and goals.
  7. If you plan to share information learned during the interview in an essay, an article, or a post on social media, get permission from your interviewee first. And good grief, NEVER record someone without his permission either.
  8. Dress appropriately yet comfortably. If you’re meeting on-site at a company or office, dress professionally (business casual). If you’re meeting for coffee or lunch on the weekend or in the evening, tone it down slightly. But remember, just as when dressing for job interviews, you’re not trying to show off your assets during an informational interview. This meeting is not about you. Don’t try to make it about you by selecting flashy or provocative clothing.Dress comfortably, not just appropriately, because sometimes we can’t predict how far we’ll walk from the parking lot to the building or whether we will climb three flights of stairs. An informational interview isn’t the time to wear new shoes or a tight, straight skirt.
  9. Follow up and express gratitude. This should always be your last step. Don’t walk away from an informational interview, shake hands, and forget to send an email or thank you card (I prefer thank you cards). Connect on social media, too. This makes it easy for you to regularly touch base with your new contact, mentor, and friend.

An informational interview can be a great strategy in your career development or job search process. But knowing when to ask, who to ask, how to ask, and how to pull it off can be tricky. Contact me if you might benefit from networking coaching or an interview prep session.